Poem Podcast from the Poetry Translation Centre

This week's poem is 'Last Conversation with the Sky' by Noshi Gillani from Pakistan. The poem is read first in English translation by Lavinia Greenlaw and then in Urdu by Kamila Shamsie.

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the work of the Poetry Translation Centre then please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us

Direct download: PP_Noshi_Last_Conversation_with_the_Sky_2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:00am UTC

This week's poem is 'Lucky Men' by Partaw Naderi from Afghanistan. The poem is read first in English translation by Sarah Maguire and then in Dari by Partaw himself. 

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us

Direct download: PP_Partaw_Lucky_Men_2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:00am UTC

This week’s poem is 'Forgotten by Time' by Farzaneh Khojandi from Tajikistan. The poem is read first in English translation by Jo Shapcott and then in Tajik by Farzaneh Khojandi.

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us.

Direct download: PTC_Farzaneh_Forgotten_by_Time_2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:32am UTC

This poem by was translated ay at a PTC workshop run by our founder Sarah Maguire. In her translation notes, she ponders the origins of rhubarb as the distinctive plant gets referenced in the third line of the poem:

'We Brits tend to think of rhubarb as being a very distinctive British - especially Yorkshire - plant and so we were pleased to come across it the very different context of a poem by a Kurdish poet written when he was living in Moscow. (In fact, the plant originated in China and was brought to Britain during the fourteenth century via the Silk Route and was first known as 'Turkish Rhubarb'.)

This small poem is, of course, a wry reflection on the ancient culture of the Kurds who, although swindled and pushed from pillar to post for centuries, have not (yet) been accepted as a nation.'

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us.

Direct download: A_Few_Lines_About_My_Age.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:06am UTC

This poem perfectly encapsulates his strengths as a poet: concision and clarity, delivered in language that is both exact and understated. Poems such as these which seem, at first glance, to be very simple, are extraordinarily difficult to pull off. Their ‘simplicity is, of course, deceptive: these few lines are like a miniature short story in the way they manage to convey the hope and despair of an entire life, in this case an Iranian economic migrant forced into back-breaking labour in Pakistan.

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us.

Direct download: Coming_Back_From_the_Hemp_Plantation.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:44am UTC

Karin Karakaşlı is an Armenian-Turkish poet who lives in Istanbul and writes in Turkish. As well as poetry she pens regular columns and opinion pieces for independent media outlets and writes fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature.

Her PTC Chapbook History-Geography was reviewed by Katrina Naomi who called it 'that rare thing - good, political poetry'.

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us

Direct download: r_KARIN_KARAKASLI_HISTORY_GEOGRAPHY.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am UTC

Abdullah al Ryami was born in 1965 in Cairo, where his father had taken refuge from the British-backed suppression of the Omani uprising. As a result of this displacement, Al Ryami's life has been that of an outsider. His first collection of poems was published in 1992. He helped to found the avant-garde theatre group A'Shams, where he worked as dramatist and artistic director; and Najma Publications, which specialises in modern poetry, novels and works in translation; in 2000 he returned to Oman where he works as a theatrical director, journalist and cultural commentator.

 If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us
 

 

Direct download: Speed_-_Abdullah_al_Ryami.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:17am UTC

This week's poem is 'Far-Off Settlements' by Coral Bracho from Mexico. The poem is read first in English translation by Katherine Pierpoint and then in Spanish by Coral herself.

Coral Bracho came to England for the inaugural World Poets' Tour in 2005 and read with her poet-translator Katherine Pierpoint. The Guardian journalist Richar Lea asked Pierpoint how she has found the process of working with the PTC. 'She was quick to stress the help she had from Dr Tom Boll, who gave her literal translations of the Spanish originals. "This three-way process of working in a team has been particularly rewarding," she says, though she did sometimes have doubts about the project. "There are times when you ask yourself whether you're just translating the content of the poem and not the value."She sees the role of a translator as conveying the essence of an original. "It's Coral's party," she says, "you're just there as a channel." '

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us

Direct download: PP_Coral_Far_Off_Settlements_2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:18am UTC

This week's poem podcast is 'Woman of Mint' by Fatena Al-Gharra, translated by Sara Vaghefian and Sarah Maguire, the founder of the PTC.

In her notes on the translation, Maguire commented 'Poetry in English is filled with poems that use plants to articulate gender. By and large, it's men poets who continually compare women to fragile, delicate flowers ... It's fascinating to witness a woman poet writing in Arabic using a 'feminine' mint plant and a 'masculine' nettle to express her feelings about gender.'

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us

Direct download: Woman_of_Mint.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:38am UTC

This week's poem is 'Rain' by Kajal Ahmad from Kurdistan. The poem is read first in English translation by Mimi Khalvati and then in Kurdish by Kajal Ahmad. If you enjoy this poem and would like to find out more about Kajal Ahmad and all the other poets we've translated, please visit our website www.poetrytranslation.org.

Direct download: PTC_Kajal_Rain_3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:26am UTC

Listen to the 'Movements' by Fatena Al-Gharra, Translated from the Arabic by Anna Murison and the Poetry Translation Workshop.

The poem is read first in English by the poet-translator Sarah Maguire and then in Arabic by the poet Al-Saddiq Al-Raddi.

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us

Direct download: Movements.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 2:21pm UTC

Karin Karakaşlı is an Armenian-Turkish poet who lives in Istanbul and writes in Turkish. As well as poetry she pens regular columns and opinion pieces for independent media outlets and writes fiction, non-fiction and children’s literature. The deep pain and scars left by Turkey’s negationist state discourse on the Armenian genocide of 1915 are visible throughout Karakaşlı’s oeuvre and are omnipresent in her poetry. The Turkish state’s continual suppression of the forming of a common memory affects people not only of Armenian descent but from many communities such as the Greeks and the Kurds. This denial is an example of how, government after government, those in power in Turkey have consistently erased the history of whole parts of their population. It is in this context of past and present violations of basic rights, freedoms of expression and human dignity that Karin Karakaşlı seeks to exist with her poetry.

Canan Marasligil, from her introduction to Karin's Chapbook History-Geography

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us

Direct download: r_KARIN_KARAKASLI_DESERTED.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:19am UTC

The poem was originally one of the songs in the play Wadnahaan far ku hayaa but it became so overwhelmingly popular that, eventually, it completely overwhelmed performances of the play itself. As readers will discern, the reason for its popularity - and why it enraged the military dictatorship of the time - is because its vivid, skilful metaphors are open to a variety of interpretations. This poem, which led to Hadraawi's five-year imprisonment in Qansaxdheere, goes to the very heart of his genius.

WN Herbert, Poet-translator

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us
Direct download: The_Killing_of_the_She-Camel_by_Hadraawi_3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:45pm UTC

Karin Karakaşlı’s pain can be deeply felt in most of her poems. However alongside this we encounter an enormous amount of love for the geography she lives in, especially the city of Istanbul. Karakaşlı has an almost synergetic relationship with this city, as we can see in this
poem ‘Galata’ – with the history embedded in every stone, every
building and every landscape.

The poem is about the poet's love of a medieval stone tower in Istanbul, Turkey.

If you enjoy this podcast and would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us

Direct download: r_KARIN_KARAKASLI_GALATA.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:16pm UTC

Today's podcast poem is 'Aural ' by David Huerta from Mexico.  The poem is read first in English translation by Jamie McKendrick and then in Spanish by David. 

This week we are celebrating #MediaPoems on www.poetrytranslation.org.

If you would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us.

 

 

Direct download: PP_David__Aural_3.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:05am UTC

Al-Saddiq Al-Raddi

This week's poem is by Al-Saddiq Al-Raddi from Sudan.  The poem is read first in English translation by Sarah Maguire and then in Arabic by Saddiq himself. If you enjoy this poem and would like to find out more about Al-Saddiq Al-Raddi and all the other poets we’ve translated, please visit our website www.poetrytranslation.org.

 

If you would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us.

Direct download: PP_Saddiq_Siesta_2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:00am UTC

This week's poem is 'Please bring a token home from each journey' by Noshi Gillani from Pakistan. The poem is read first in English translation by Lavinia Greenlaw and then in Urdu by Shamila Kamsie.

If you enjoyed this recording and would like to learn more about Noshi and all the other poets we've translated, please visit our website at www.poetrytranslation.org.

If you would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us.

Direct download: PP_Noshi_Please_Bring_a_Token_Home_from_each_Journey_2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:12am UTC

This week's poem is by Victor Teran from Mexico.  The poem is read first in English translation by David Shook and then in Zapotec by Victor himself. If you enjoy this recording and would like to find out more about Victor Teran and all the other poets we’ve translated, please visit our website www.poetrytranslation.org.

If you would like to support the Poetry Translation Centre please visit poetrytranslation.org/support-us.

Direct download: PP_Victor_Just_Yesterday__2.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 6:50pm UTC